Rabbits

Lifespan:  5-15 yrs

Equipment:  Habitats with wired tops and solid plastic bottoms are readily available.  Make sure the plastic bottom is deep enough to contain the bedding.  You will also need a bowl for food, a water bottle, and some toys and chewing blocks.  Many different types of bedding is available.  Its best to use paper products.  Bedding made from cedar or pine can cause respiratory problems that can be fatal to your pet.   

Diet:  A proper diet is of utmost important to the life and well-being of your bunny. A proper diet should include unlimited fresh hay, pellets and fresh greens. Hay must be available at all times.

Hay is one of the most important parts of your bunny’s diet. Fresh hay should be provided at all times. Hay is rich in nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and proteins. Hay also provides healthy chewing activity to promote proper wear of the teeth (the teeth of a rabbit grow continuously throughout their life) and chewing also provides healthy mental activity which decreases destruction of inappropriate objects. The healthiest choice is Timothy Hay. Fresh greens are equally as important as hay in the rabbit’s diet. Remember we said that rabbits are designed to eat grasses and leaves, so green foods represent the “leaf” part of the diet. Start out slowly when adding a new green to your rabbit’s diet.

Fruits can be fed as a treat in very limited quantities. Limit fruits to 1-2 tablespoons per 5 lbs. of body weight.  Sugary fruits such as bananas and grapes should be used only sparingly, as occasional treats. Bunnies have a sweet tooth and if left to their own devices will devour sugary foods to the exclusion of healthful ones. Below please find a list of acceptable fruits.  Absolutely NO chocolate, cookies, crackers, breakfast cereals, bread, pasta, yogurt drops, or other “human treats.” There is research to suggest these items may contribute to fatal cases of toxic overgrowth of “bad” bacteria in the intestinal tract. Fresh water should be available at all times. Rinse the water bottle out every day and give it a good cleaning about three times a week to prevent algae build up.

 

Exercise:  Rabbits need lots of attention from family members and exercise.

They have powerful hind legs designed for running and jumping. The minimum recommended cage space for a single rabbit of a small- to medium-sized breed is four feet wide, two feet deep and two feet tall.
Home/Environment:  Rabbits can be messy, so you’ll need to clean your pet’s cage once or twice weekly.  Rabbits do not like dirtying their cage. Luckily, they can be litter trained. Let your rabbit run around and get some exercise while you clean his cage. Pick up your rabbit by supporting his forequarters with one hand and his hindquarters with the other, failure to do so can result in spinal injuries to the rabbit. Never pick up a rabbit by his ears; this can cause very serious injury. Brush your rabbit regularly with a soft brush to remove excess hair and keep his coat in good condition. Brush from the back of the head down to the tail. Trimming the nails is easy but if you feel uncomfortable, take your rabbit to the vet and watch the process to get a good handle on it. Make sure you have a supply of cotton balls around for the first try at trimming the nails in case you accidentally cut into the quick.

Oxow

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Information

Lifespan:  5-15 yrs

Equipment:  Habitats with wired tops and solid plastic bottoms are readily available.  Make sure the plastic bottom is deep enough to contain the bedding.  You will also need a bowl for food, a water bottle, and some toys and chewing blocks.  Many different types of bedding is available.  Its best to use paper products.  Bedding made from cedar or pine can cause respiratory problems that can be fatal to your pet.   

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Care and Feeding

Diet:  A proper diet is of utmost important to the life and well-being of your bunny. A proper diet should include unlimited fresh hay, pellets and fresh greens. Hay must be available at all times.

Hay is one of the most important parts of your bunny’s diet. Fresh hay should be provided at all times. Hay is rich in nutrients such as vitamins, minerals, and proteins. Hay also provides healthy chewing activity to promote proper wear of the teeth (the teeth of a rabbit grow continuously throughout their life) and chewing also provides healthy mental activity which decreases destruction of inappropriate objects. The healthiest choice is Timothy Hay. Fresh greens are equally as important as hay in the rabbit’s diet. Remember we said that rabbits are designed to eat grasses and leaves, so green foods represent the “leaf” part of the diet. Start out slowly when adding a new green to your rabbit’s diet.

Fruits can be fed as a treat in very limited quantities. Limit fruits to 1-2 tablespoons per 5 lbs. of body weight.  Sugary fruits such as bananas and grapes should be used only sparingly, as occasional treats. Bunnies have a sweet tooth and if left to their own devices will devour sugary foods to the exclusion of healthful ones. Below please find a list of acceptable fruits.  Absolutely NO chocolate, cookies, crackers, breakfast cereals, bread, pasta, yogurt drops, or other “human treats.” There is research to suggest these items may contribute to fatal cases of toxic overgrowth of “bad” bacteria in the intestinal tract. Fresh water should be available at all times. Rinse the water bottle out every day and give it a good cleaning about three times a week to prevent algae build up.

 

Exercise:  Rabbits need lots of attention from family members and exercise.

They have powerful hind legs designed for running and jumping. The minimum recommended cage space for a single rabbit of a small- to medium-sized breed is four feet wide, two feet deep and two feet tall.
Home/Environment:  Rabbits can be messy, so you’ll need to clean your pet’s cage once or twice weekly.  Rabbits do not like dirtying their cage. Luckily, they can be litter trained. Let your rabbit run around and get some exercise while you clean his cage. Pick up your rabbit by supporting his forequarters with one hand and his hindquarters with the other, failure to do so can result in spinal injuries to the rabbit. Never pick up a rabbit by his ears; this can cause very serious injury. Brush your rabbit regularly with a soft brush to remove excess hair and keep his coat in good condition. Brush from the back of the head down to the tail. Trimming the nails is easy but if you feel uncomfortable, take your rabbit to the vet and watch the process to get a good handle on it. Make sure you have a supply of cotton balls around for the first try at trimming the nails in case you accidentally cut into the quick.

Oxow